Free Audio Book Little House in the Big Woods – Laura Ingalls Wilder

0aFree Audio Version of Little House in the Big Woods, the first Laura Ingalls Wilders Little House book published in 1932.

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Chapter 1

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The following scanned pages are from Amazon, where you can buy the book.

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“then he fitted it into place, and that was the little door, with the bark still on it.

“After the deer meat had been salted several days, Pa cut a hole near the end of each piece and put a string through it. Laura watched him do this, and then she watched him hang the meat on the nails in the hollow log.

“He reached up through the little door and hung meat on the nails, as far up as he could reach. Then he put a ladder against the log, climbed up to the top, moved the roof to one side, and reached down inside to hang meat on those nails.

“Then Pa put the roof back again, climbed down the ladder, and said to Laura:

“Fun over to the chopping black and fetch me some of those green hickory chips–new, clean, white ones.

“So Laura ran to the block where Pa chopped wood, and filled her apron with the fresh, sweet-smelling chips.

“Just inside the little door in the hollow log Pa built a fire of tiny bits of bark and moss, and he laid some of the chips on it very carefully.

“Instead of burning quickly, the green chips

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Butchering the hog – pages 13 –

“Near the pigpen Pa and Uncle Henry built a bonfire, and heated a great kettle of water over it. When the water was boiling they went to kill the hog. Then Laura an and hid her head on the bed and stopped her ears with her fingers so she could not hear the hog squeal….

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  Playing with the pig bladder

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Making Cracklings – page 17

“All that day and the next, Ma was trying out the lard in big iron pots on the cookstove. Laura and Mary carried wood and watched the fire. It must be hot, but not too hot, or the lard would burn. The big pots simmered and boiled, but they must not smoke. From time to time Ma skimmed out the brown cracklings. She put them in a cloth and squeezed out every bit of the lard, and then she put the cracklings away. She would use them to flavor johnny-cake later.”

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Chapter 2

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The Snow and Jack Frost – pages 26 – 27

“The snow kept coming till it was drifted and banked against the house. In the mornings the window panes were covered with frost in beautiful pictures of trees and flowers and fairies.

“Ma said that Jack Frost came in the night and made the pictures, while everyone was asleep. Laura thought that Jack Frost was a little man all snowy white, wearing a glittering white pointed cap and soft white knee-boots make of deer-skin. His coat was white and his mittens were white, and he did not carry a gun on his back, but in his hands he had shining sharp tools with which he cared the pictures.

“Laura and Mary were allowed to take Ma’s thimble and amke pretty patterns of circles in the frost on the glass. But they never spoiled the pictures that Jack Frost had made in the night.

“When they put their mouths close to the pane and blew their breath on it, the white frost melted and ran in drops down the glass. Then they could see the drifts of snow outdoors and the great trees standing bare and black, making thin blue shadows on the white snow.”

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Churning and Coloring the Butter – pages 29 – 30

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Chapter 3

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Chapter 4

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“Ma was busy all day long, cooking good things for Christmas. She baked salt-rising bread and rye-n-Injun bread, and Swedish crackers, and a huge pan of baked beans, with salt pork and molasses. She baked vinegar pies and dried-apple pies, and filled a big jar with cookies, and whe let Laura and Mary likc he cake spoon.

“One morning she boiled molasses and sugar together until they made a thick syrup, and Pa rought in two pans of clean,white snow from outdoors. Laura and Mary each had a pan, and Pa and Ma showed them how to pour the dark syrup in little streams onto the snow.

“They made circles, and curlicures, and squggledy things, and these hardened at once and were candy. Laura and Mary might eat one piece each, bt the rest as saved for Christmas Day.

“All of this was done because Aunt Eliza and Uncle Peter and the cousins, Peter and Alice and Ella, were coming to spend Christmas.

“The day before Christmas they came. Laura and Mary heard the gay ringing of sleighbells, growing louder every moment, and then the big bobsled came out of the woods and drove up to the gate. Aunt Eliza and Uncle Peter and the cousins were in it, all overed up, uder blankets and robes and bffalo skins.

“They were wrapped up in so many coats and muflers and veils and shawls that they looked like big, shapeless bundles.

“When they all came in, the little house was full and running over. Black Susan ran out and hid in the barn, but Jack leaped in circles through the snow, barking as though he would never stop. Now there were cousins to play with!

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“So Pa got his fiddle.

“The rom was still and warm and full of fire-light. Ma’s shadow, and Aunt Eliza’s and Uncle Peter’s were big and quivering on the wall in the flickering fire-light, and Pa’s fiddle sang merrilly o itself….

“In the morning they all woke up almost at the same moment. They looked at their stockings, and someting was in them. Santa Claus had been there. Alice and Ella and Laura in their red flannel nightgowns, and Peter in his red flannel nightshirt, all ran shouting to see what he had brought.

“In each stocking there was a pair of bright red mittens, and there was a long, flat stick of red-and-hite-striped peppermint candy, all beautifully notched along each side.

“They were all so happy they could hardly speak at first. They just looked with shining eyes at those lovely Christmas presents. But Laura was happiest of all. Laura had a rag doll.

“She was a beautiful doll. She had a face of white cloth with black button eyes. A black pencil had made her eyebrows, and her cheeks and her mouth were red.

“So Laura let Mary take the beautiful doll, and then Alice held her a minue, and then Ella. They smoothed the pretty dress and admired the red flannel stockings and the gaiters, and the curly woolen hair.  But Laura was glad when at last Charlotte was safe in her arms again.

“In the morning they all woke up almost at the same moment. They looked at their stockings, and someting was in them. Santa Claus had been there. Alice and Ella and Laura in their red flannel nightgowns, and Peter in his red flannel nightshirt, all ran shouting to see what he had brought.

“In each stocking there was a pair of bright red mittens, and there was a long, flat stick of red-and-hite-striped peppermint candy, all beautifully notched along each side.

“They were all so happy they could hardly speak at first. They just looked with shining eyes at those lovely Christmas presents. But Laura was happiest of all. Laura had a rag doll.

“She was a beautiful doll. She had a face of white cloth with black button eyes. A black pencil had made her eyebrows, and her cheeks and her mouth were redwith the ink made from pokeberries. Her hair was black yarn that had been knit and raveled, so that it was curly.

“She had little red flannel stokings and little black cloth gaiters for shoes, and her dess was pretty pink and blue calico.

“She was so beautiful that Laura could not say a word. She just held her tight and forgot everything else. She did not know that everyone was looking at her, til Aunt Eliza said:

‘Did you ever see such big yes@’

“The other girls were not jealous because Laura had mittens, and candy, and a doll, because Laur was the littlest girl, except Baby Darried and Aunt Eilaz’s little abby, Dolly Varden. The babies were too small for dolls. They were so small they did not even know about Santa Claus. They just put their fingers in their mouths and wriggled because of all the excitement.

Laura sat down on the edge of the bed and held her doll. Sheloved her red mittens and she loved the candy, but she loved her doll best of all. She named her Charlotte.

“Then they all looked at each other’s mittens, and tried on their own, and Peter bit a large piece out of his stick of candy, but Alice and Ella and Mary and Laura licked theirs, to make it last longer. …

Ma said, ‘Laura, aren’t you going to let the other girls hold yor doll?’ She meant, ‘Little girls must not be so selfist.’

“So Laura let Mary take the beautiful doll, and then Alice held her a minue, and then Ella. They smoothed the pretty dress and admired the red flannel stockings and the gaiters, and the curly woolen hair.  But Laura was glad when at last Charlotte was safe in her arms again.”

“Pa and Uncle Peter had each a pair of new, warm mittens, knit in little squares of red and white. Ma and Aunt Eliza had made thm.

“Aunt Eliza had brought Ma a large red apple stuck full of cloves. How good it smelled! And it would not spoil, for so many cloves would keep it sound and sweet.

“Ma gave Aunt Eliza a little needle0book she had make, with bits of silk for coveers and soft white flannel leaves into which to stick the needles. The flannel would keep the needles from rusting.

:They all admired Ma’s beautiful bracelet and Aunt Eliza said that Uncle Peter had made one for her–of course, with different carving.

“Santa Claus had not given themanything at all. Sant Claus did not give grown people presents, but that was not because they had not been good. Pa and Ma were good. It was because they were grown up, and grown people must give each other presents. ….

“For breakfast there were pancakes, and Mad made a pancake man for each one of the children. Ma called each one in trn to bring her plate, and each could stand by the stove and watch, while with the spoonful of batter Mat put on the arms and the legs and the head. It was exciting to watch her turn the whole little man over, quickly and carefully , on a hot griddle. When it was done, she put it smoking not on the plate.

“Peter at the head off his man, right away. But Alice and Mary and Laura ate theirs slowly in little bits, first the arms and legs and then the middle, saving the head for the last.

“Today the weather was so cold that they could not play outdoors, but there were the new mittens to admire, and the candy to licek. And hey all sat on the floor together and looked at the pictures in the Bible, and the pictures of all kinds of animals and birds in Pa’s big green book. Laura kept Charlotte in her arms the whole time.

“Then there was the Christmas dinner. Alice and Elala and Peter and Mary and Laura did not say a word at table, for they knew that children should be seen and not heard. But they did not need to ask for second helpings. Ma and Aunt Eliza kept their plates fll and let them eat all the good things they could hold.

‘Christmas comes but once a year,’ said Aunt Eliza.

“Dinner was early, because Aunt Eliza, Uncle Peter and the cousins had such a long way to go.

‘Best the horses can do,’ Uncle pEter said, ‘we’ll harly make it home before dark.’

“So as soona s they had eaten dinner, Uncle Peter and Pa went to put the horses to the sled while Ma and Aunt Eliza wrapped up the cousins.

“They pulled heavy woolen stockings over the woolen stockings and the shoes they were already wearing. They put on mittens and coats and warm hoods and shawls, and wrapped muflers around their necs and thick woolen veils over their faces. Ma slipped piping hot baked potatoes into their pockets to keep their fingers warm, and Aunt Eiliza’s flatirons were hot on the stove, ready to put at their feet at the sled. The blankets amd tje qio;ts and the buffalo robes were warmed, too.

“So they all got into the big bobsled, cosy and warm, and P tucked the last robe well in around them.

‘Goood-by! Good-by! they called, and off they went, the horses trotting gaily ad the sleigh bell ringing.

“In just a little while the merry sound of the bells was gone, and Christmas was over, but what what a happy Christmas it had been!”

Chapter 5

Chapter 6

Chapter 7

Chapter 8

Chapter 9

Chapter 10

Chapter 11

Chapter 12

Chapter 13

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