Another Experiment to Illustrate the Power of Images – Compare My Great Aunt’s Account of My Family’s Westward Migration With and Without Images

fall-colors-309243_appalachia-640

My ancestors were among the earliest people to settle in Virginia, and my family’s history is that of the people who carved their ways through the Cumberland Gap, crossed Appalachia, and finally arrived in the Southern Midwest. I am fortunate that I have my great aunt’s words that she must have directly overheard, describing my people’s movement west.

As a visual experiment, I will first share some of my great aunt’s words without images. Then, I’ll share them again, with images.  Judge which account is more vivid to you.

What My Great Aunt Said:

“Kenley and Mayme experienced many moves and changes some of which consisted of log houses, wilderness, wild animals, pole roads over which they had to travel slowly during stormy winters and hot, dry summers. Wild animals were hunted, butchered and prepared for food. Also, wild animal skins were sold for fifty cents each. There were domesticated animals used for food; and, of course, there were animals as pets to enjoy and to utilize as protection. Wages at that time were $1.50 a day. They made long trips along the wagon trails, used ferry boats for crossing rivers and streams, and traded cattle and horses.

“They searched for inexpensive farm and hunting land to rent or to purchase; however, the chose to buy choice land for their home sites. Their days were filled with experiences as they met Indians who became friends, traveled with them, camped out, drank strong coffee boiled on open fire, and shared meats and other needs. Because animals were plentiful, there was sufficient food for preparing and eating by the campfire. Coal oil lanterns were utilized on their long journey. Marksmen with their guns and bows and arrows hunted deer for food. The long trips included time for Bible study although they were traveling to find work which took them from city to city and from one state to another.” Curry, Mildred.

I’ll only share a bit of the above passage with images, but I’ll provide a link to a spot where the entire account is illustrated with old photographs.

“Kenley and Mayme experienced many moves and changes some of which consisted of log houses, wilderness, wild animals, pole roads over which they had to travel slowly during stormy winters and hot, dry summers.

“Wild animals were hunted, butchered and prepared for food. Also, wild animal skins were sold for fifty cents each.

 

“There were domesticated animals used for food; and, of course, there were animals as pets to enjoy and to utilize as protection. Wages  at that time were $1.50 a day.

“They made long trips along the wagon trails, used ferry boats for crossing rivers and streams, and traded cattle and horses.”

See the rest of the illustrated account Here

While the illustrated account is probably too heavily illustrated, there is no doubt that most people will be more drawn to the text with images–as opposed to that without.

It is important to keep in mind that when a person crosses your path via social media, he is no doubt racing past. The writer has a fraction of a second to catch the attention of the passersby.  Images provide the impetus for the viewer to stop and take another glance.

The Internet has numerous studies, proving that sites that use images wisely are better viewed than those which do not. If you are willing to take the time to blog about something, take about 5 minutes more and provide a decent image or two for your post.  Doing so will probably decide whether you are viewed or not.

Read what I said about my family tree and the family’s westward expansion from Virginia: Moving West

 

 

Advertisements

2 thoughts on “Another Experiment to Illustrate the Power of Images – Compare My Great Aunt’s Account of My Family’s Westward Migration With and Without Images

Leave a Reply

Please log in using one of these methods to post your comment:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s