Einstein Quotes About the Importance of Intuition

“For it is intuition that improves the world, not just following a trodden path of thought.” – Albert Einstein

“Intuition is the father of new knowledge, while empiricism is nothing but an accumulation of old knowledge. Intuition, not intellect, is the ‘open sesame’ of yourself.” – Einstein

“Indeed, it is not intellect, but intuition which advances humanity. Intuition tells man his purpose in this life.” – Einstein

“I am enough of an artist to draw freely upon my imagination.  Imagination is more important than knowledge.  Knowledge is limited. Imagination encircles the world.” – Albert Einstein

Learning to Follow Intuition in Jacki Kellum Art Classes

“I don’t know! I don’t know why I did it, I don’t know why I enjoyed it, and I don’t know why I’ll do it again!” –    Bart Simpson

Among other art classes, I am also teaching painting to students who have Parkinson’s Disease.  This past week, my students used shades of green to paint a zentangle leaf design. [The leaf design is taken from someone else’s work.  I found that image on Google.]  If you look at the gallery of my Parkinson students’ art, you will note that in every painting, the colors skip about the page in a balanced, orderly way.  Generally speaking, when you use a color in one spot, you need to repeat that color in strategic other spots that lead the viewer’s eyes.  As the eyes skip from spot to spot to spot, a visual dance unfolds.  If the colors do not fall in strategic places, the eyes are not led throughout the painting and there is no visual dance.   Again, if you look at the gallery of the students’ paintings, you will note that the color placement is fabulous.  [If you click on one image, all the images will enlarge and you can scroll through them all.]

In looking at the paintings, you might believe that before they began to paint, the students created a road map for color placement; yet, that was not the case.  I told them to just start painting–no planning ahead.  What I hoped would happen, did happen.  The students’ intuitions guided their color placement choices.

Bart has given the artist a huge insight into understanding how art becomes.

“I don’t know! I don’t know why I did it, I don’t know why I enjoyed it, and I don’t know why I’ll do it again!” –    Bart Simpson

Often, we don’t know why we do what we do in making art.  In creating art, something that leads the eyes and urges the hand to move speaks to the artist.  Each person has a unique voice coaching him; and as he listens to his own coach–his own set of directives–the artist begins a journey along a set of stepping stones that ultimately become an individual artist’s style.

“In creating art, something speaks to the artist and that something should be allowed to lead the way. By listening to that something–that inner voice–one is able to distill one’s own vision–or style.” – Jacki Kellum

Michelangelo said that his sculptures lay within the stone itself.  In essence, he was saying that his chisel just followed the path that the natural marbling and striations paved–moving one inspired or intuitive step at a time.  This should be true for all other artists, too.  While creating, a creator is often clueless about what drives him to make one mark here or another blotch there.  There is something–an inner voice–speaking; and it is in the artist’s best interest to listen to that voice.

“Knowing why one does this or that while creating is not important–just doing is the key to becoming.  Making art is an intuitive response.  An essential key in learning to paint is learning to hear the voice of your inner artist and allowing that voice to lead the way.”  – Jacki Kellum

“The best news is that, as we calm down and begin to hear our intuitions speak, we enter a meditative-like zone.  It is within this zone that the healing power of art is unleashed.” – Jacki Kellum

“For it is intuition that improves the world, not just following a trodden path of thought.” – Albert Einstein

“Intuition is the father of new knowledge, while empiricism is nothing but an accumulation of old knowledge. Intuition, not intellect, is the ‘open sesame’ of yourself.” – Einstein

“Indeed, it is not intellect, but intuition which advances humanity. Intuition tells man his purpose in this life.” – Einstein

“I am enough of an artist to draw freely upon my imagination.  Imagination is more important than knowledge.  Knowledge is limited. Imagination encircles the world.” – Albert Einstein

The following gallery shows some of the students painting:

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Creating Art Helps Us “See” the Beauty in Our Worlds Around Us–Helps Us Live A Fuller Life

During this past autumn, I have taken advantage of fall’s colors, as I  have taught my students to paint its leaves, trees, etc.; and this past week, my students and I discussed how, after beginning art classes, we begin noticing things that we had not noticed before.  We begin to see more actively.  I shared that when I am not doing art, I myself begin to glaze over and my own life-lens becomes cloudy; but when I am painting–even when I begin teaching art, nature becomes a feast for me–a free feast that I might otherwise miss.  I told my students that the primary goal of art class should be that of availing oneself of the magnitude of the world’s beauty.  Of secondary importance are the paintings that might arise from the activity of “taking” those classes and/or of beginning to do art.

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We Americans are a spoiled lot of people.  We are thill seekers–we will pay large amounts of money for entertainment.  Disneyland–Broadway–Skiing in Vail–Europe–what we want is HUGE entertainment–large doses of stimulii.  The sad thing is that those enormous highs that we are seeking are not “there”–not in Disneyland–not on Broadway–not on the slopes–not in Europe.  Traveling offers temporary distractions from life’s blandness; but the true “thrills” are in our own yards–on our drives to work–along the paths of our morning walks.  We are just missing them.  Once we begin to take art classes–once we begin to distill nature and record it on canvas and on paper, the veil is lifted–the lens is wiped clean; and we allow ourselves to see the non-stop light show that is right before our eyes.  We allow ourselves to live life more fully.

Why Do I Exaggerate Color When I Paint?

In a recent class, a student was appalled that I used a LOT of blue and orange when painting the trunk of a tree.  Her reaction was typical of most people who are just learning to paint.  I decided that she and other students deserve more than a dismissive response to the question of why I use exaggerated color when I paint. They deserve an answer; and in this post, I’ll try to provide that.

A very simple response is that I just like color; and I use it every place that I find a chance. But those words do not really say why I use such an intense palette when I paint.  That reason is much more comlex.  To fully understand my color choices, one needs to ask WHY I actually like color.

Color is a communicator.  The colors chosen to paint a tree or the sky around that tree say much about what the tree will communicate.  For many years, I have told students that if they only want a pretty, accurate representation of a scene, they should buy a good camera.  The camera can do much that I could never do with paint–and it can do it much more rapidly and with much less expense.  A camera simply slices a piece of life and preserves it–just the way the lens sees it [if the camera and the photographer are decent].

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Photographs of Central Park in NYC.

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The camera is a machine–it reproduces what it sees and it does that without bias or emotion.  If the scene is beautiful, the photograph should be beautiful–and that’s all–just eye candy.

The artist has the option to move beyond a mechanical rendering.  The artist has the option to simplify–to omit unnecessary details and/or to exaggerate others; and to alter colors.  In doing so, the artist begins to tell a personal story.

Scientists and sociologists have studied the impact of color for many years.  It has been noted that since ancient time, colors have been used to evoke emotional responses.  In understanding the emotional impact of color, one moves closer to my own reasons and purposes for using exaggerated colors when painting.

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In the above painting, Paint the Blues Away, I purposely exaggerated the blues to convey the cold, dreary mood of winter.  Red, being the color of blood, is the color of energy–of life.  When I paint, I use a lot of red–and I do it very deliberately–to infuse my subject matter with energy–with emphasis–with punch.

My paintings are a continuous battle of darks and lights–regressions and egressions–of deaths and life.  I use color to express that battle; and in every painting, I count on red to not only win the battle but to fly the flag of victory.

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November Rain

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Hallow’s Eve

To read about the meanings of and emotional associatons with specific colors, check out the following post:  https://jackikellum.wordpress.com/2014/09/26/paint-to-experience-the-power-of-color/