How to Use 5 Colors to Paint a Simple Fall Twig Landscape – Very Limited Palette

Load a clean, wet brush with cadmium yellow light a plot a swatch of paint in the middle of the place on the paper that you have already moistened.  Just plop the paint in and pick up your brush.  Don’t paint back and forth with you brush–just one plop.

The water will begin to move the paint a bit.

TwigPainting 1

Rinse your brush and wipe it clean on a paper towl.  Moisten the brush a bit more [you don’t want to wipe all of the water out of your brush; but you don’t want the brush to be too wet either].

TwigPainting 2

Get some camium orange light on your brush.  With one single stroke float some orange in the lower half of the yellow swath.  You want some yellow to be left.  Don’t brush back and forth.  Pick up your brush and allow the water to mix the paint SLIGHTLY.  Don’t lose all of the yellow.

To encourage your paint to mix the way you want, you will probably need a slight angle to your paper.  [See Below] I have placed the lower part of a tube of paint beneath the top of my paper.

Before you add the twig-tree, understand that trees are nothing more than masses of Y’s.

I say over and again that in watercolor, you paint as much with water as you do with paint — perhaps more.  In the above image, I cleaned my brush and loaded it with a bit of clear water.  Beginning in the puddle of orange paint, I drug the Y’s of the twig through the paint–sort of erasing the paint there.  Well, actually, the paint is not erased, it is merely lightened — a lot by the water.

Still with more water than paint, I dab my brush into a tiny, tiny bit of phthalo blue paint and I lightly streak the blue in an around the Y’s of the twig.  I skip areas.  I do not want this to be one solid line–a skipped, light line of paint.

Note:  if the tree is in the distance, where little detail can be seen, you could stop here.  In fact, you could stop here if you like what your see.  If you want more detail, we’ll add a bit more paint.

First, I dragged some orangish strokes of grass from the ground area.

Then, I picked up ultramarine blue and dabbed a bit beneath the tree and intermittently around the roots of the tree.  I also streaked a bit on the very outside of the trunk to darken it and thus shae it.  I added a couple of small, blurred streaks of the ultramrine–adding to the number of Y’s .  Again, this is not one solid streak–it is a network of dots and dashes of colors.

Angular, Set of 7

I paint almost exclusively with flat angular brushes that have tapered or chiseled ends.  The ends look like what you would use to  push your cuticles back

angularbrushchiseledend

If you drag the side of the tip, you scrape paint away–creating white or light areas.  If you use the edge of the side and sort of slice the paper, the thin “slices” fill with pigment and become darker.  You can also lightly drag the tip–and use it sort of like a paint brush–to paint or drag areas of paint.  In the following image, I used the plastic, chiseled end in all of these ways

Notice the amount of gray and brown that is on the painting.  I have used neither brown, gray, or black paint.  Blue and orange create browns and grays

TwigPainting 037   Ths container is some kind of bead box.

 These are food storage containers.  As long as the container is white [not clear], it will be good.

Unfortunately ly, complements [like blue and orange. red and green, and purple and yellow] mix even when you don’t want them to do that.  I keep my paints separate; and I white, divided container is good for that purpose.  I also continuously change my water  Your water must be absolutely clean.   I also use water containers with dividers.  The following container can be purchased at any art supply store.  The grooved bottom is used to more thoroughy clean the brush.  It knocks lodged paint off the brush.

TwigPainting 043

I tend to do a lot of calligraphic brush or line work in my watercolor studies.  I use a liner brush to paint the lines; and I create a dark gray or brown wash by combining phthalo blue,utramarine blue, orange, red, etc.  I thin the mixture to that of India ink.  If it is not dark enough, I add a bit of indigo paint.

Note:  when I got red and orange paint to mix with the inky color, I messed up both the red and the orange blocks of color.  I will wipe that clean before I paint again.  I keep my color sections absolutely clean.

A liner brush has a long, skinny brush tip.  It is designed for painting calligraphic lines.

Notice the amount of gray and brown that is on the painting.  I have used neither brown, gray, or black paint.  Blue and orange create browns and grays

TwigPainting 037   Ths container is some kind of bead box.

 These are food storage containers.  As long as the container is white [not clear], it will be good.

Unfortunately ly, complements [like blue and orange. red and green, and purple and yellow] mix even when you don’t want them to do that.  I keep my paints separate; and I white, divided container is good for that purpose.  I also continuously change my water  Your water must be absolutely clean.   I also use water containers with dividers.  The following container can be purchased at any art supply store.  The grooved bottom is used to more thoroughy clean the brush.  It knocks lodged paint off the brush.

TwigPainting 043

I tend to do a lot of calligraphic brush or line work in my watercolor studies.  I use a liner brush to paint the lines; and I create a dark gray or brown wash by combining phthalo blue,utramarine blue, orange, red, etc.  I thin the mixture to that of India ink.  If it is not dark enough, I add a bit of indigo paint.

Note:  when I got red and orange paint to mix with the inky color, I messed up both the red and the orange blocks of color.  I will wipe that clean before I paint again.  I keep my color sections absolutely clean.

A liner brush has a long, skinny brush tip.  It is designed for painting calligraphic lines.

Advertisements

Leave a Reply

Please log in using one of these methods to post your comment:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s