“Training and cultivating the child’s intuitiveness, his sense of wonder, and his inventiveness is crucial.” – Jacki Kellum

Shayne Primrose Feb 15 2012

” One of the primary aims of my program is to find and preserve the child within–for that is where the artist resides.” – Jacki Kellum

 ”Being an artist is a way of Being–of becoming Aware–of Increasing from Within–of Wondering–and of Inventing because of that Wonder.” – Jacki Kellum

“Every child is an artist. The problem is how to remain an artist once we have grown up.” – Pablo Picasso

I cannot say enough that art is not an age thing.  At least, the children have nothing to worry about in this regard.  That might not be so very true for adults.  At the very least, children’s art must never be overlooked; it is the adult artists who are lagging behind in that race.

The greatest challenge to becoming an artist is that of remaining childlike–at least from within; and in this cold, relentless world, a child needs a great deal of encouragement and coaching to be able to retain his spirit and energy.

“Every child is an artist. The problem is how to remain an artist once we have grown up.” – Pablo Picasso

I am not teasing when I say that doing their daily art thing is as important for children as is brushing their teeth–perhaps more.

One might argue that they don’t want their children to be “artists,” thinking of the title in its narrowest form, as a group of Bohemians who waste money on art supplies. Let me say again and again and again: Being an artist is not necessarily that of being a painter or the like.

“Being an artist is a way of Being–of Becoming Aware–of Increasing from Within–of Wondering–and of Inventing Because of that wonder.” -Jacki Kellum

Training and preserving the inventive mind is essential to success in almost every field of endeavor.  All of our great leaders–including those who are currently paving new paths in Social Media [the inventors of Facebook, YouTube, Windows, Apple, etc.,] are all artists — they have invented new realities for mankind.

“I am enough of an artist to draw freely upon my imagination. Imagination is more important than knowledge. Knowledge is limited. Imagination encircles the world.” – Albert Einstein

“Logic will get you from A to Z; imagination will get you everywhere.” – Albert Einstein

For those who might wonder why I continue to teach children, I am happy to say that it is because I love it.  I love being part of the magical process of a child’s inventiveness–his imagination.  Every time a child walks through my door, they bring their pixie dust with them.  Children have amazing gifts of unbridled intuition, enthusiasm, and imagination.  I have taught many, many incredible children.  In fact, every time I am ready to just give up on life, God loans me another prodigy to be my art student.

I wrote one of my masters theses on William Blake who wrote The Songs of Innocence and Experience, among many other much more complex works. His treatise was [as has always been mine] that the child is superior until maturity dims childhood’s brilliance and honesty.

“One of the primary aims of my program is to find and preserve that child within–for that is where the artist resides.” – Jacki Kellum.

I urge parents o find true artists who can teach art to their children and to do that while their children are still that, children. The problem is that of finding the correct teacher. A poor art teacher can be devastating. Many who paint and draw are not artists; and in the same way, most who teach art are not artists themselves. They have no vision, no understanding, and no empathy for a child’s true gifts. Instead, they push accuracy too much and not vision enough.  That is a certain way to kill a child’s Intuitiveness, which is the Essence of the Child Within.

“Teaching children the technical tools of art [drawing, painting, etc.,] is important; training and cultivating the child’s intuitiveness, his sense of wonder, and his inventiveness is crucial.” – Jacki Kellum 

 

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